Diablo’s Baby Cousin (Bastion)

Game: Bastion
Genre: Action-adventure, Role playing
Platforms: PS4, PC, Xbox One
ESRB Rating: Everyone 10+
Completion Time: 7 hours (Main levels)
Average Critic Score: 87.6/100
My Score: 85/100

Sorry I’m a bit late this week. School has been kicking my ass lately. Anyway no need to worry, I’m here now and I must admit, I missed the boat on this one. Bastion initially came out in 2011 when I admittedly was still in high school playing Call of Duty and Minecraft. Not that there’s anything wrong with those games, they just consumed virtually all of my free time, but that’s beside the point. This is 2017 and I want to talk about Bastion gosh darn it! Because if you haven’t played this game, it’s definitely worth checking out.

Narrating Your Every Move

The whole premise of Bastion is you’re a kid that wakes up after some catastrophic event wipes out the majority of life on your world. At first it seems “The Kid”, as he’s referred to, is the only survivor but as you wake up and begin to move around a voice appears. The voice tells “The Kid” to head to the Bastion, where everyone is supposed to gather in times of emergency, and the adventure begins.

The narrator, (you’ll learn his name later) follows you throughout your journey giving you information on where you are, enemies you face and things like that. The narration is one of the best parts of Bastion, in fact the game won many awards for it. The voice acting of the narrator is top notch and it gives off sort of an old wise man vibe but with much more badassary. Think Gandalf meets Samuel L. Jackson. I know it’s not a great analogy but it’s the best I can come up with right now. The game utilizes the narration in a cool way because instead of making you sit through cut scenes or read long scrolls of text, you can just play the game and the narrator will explain as you go.

Simple Yet Somewhat Effective

The problem with Bastion lies in its effort to balance gameplay and story. Don’t get me wrong, the game is fun to play, but I sometimes found myself wondering “what’s the point?” and that’s a problem. The story just wasn’t engaging enough for me to really care.

I named this post “Diablo’s Baby Cousin” because my first impressions of the gameplay reminded me a lot of Diablo but a much more simplified version. If you’ve ever played Diablo, specifically Diablo 3 (one of my all time favorites by the way), the mechanics are very similar. You have attacks assigned to specific buttons, a special attack that you can only use a certain amount of times and the ability to dodge/evade enemy attacks.

Overall the game took me about 7 hours to finish, that’s however just the main story missions. There are side missions that coincide with each different weapon but I only ended doing about half of them. Completing these missions will give you an upgrade part that you can use to enhance an ability of the weapon. If you have the time to kill they’re great but you can easily get through the game without them.

A Soundtrack for the Ages

The music was another strong point of Bastion. I wish now that when I initially played through the game that I had the volume up higher because it wasn’t until I listened to the soundtrack afterwords that I realized how good it is. It was so good that the developers never planned on releasing the soundtrack, but due to the demand of fans they eventually did. Seriously listen to it! The music had sort of an Asian meets Western kind of style which at first thought doesn’t really sound like it would work, but looking at the overall style of the game it fits quite well.

Critic Scores

And last but not least, here’s how the critics felt about Bastion. 

  • Metacritic: 
    • PC – 86/100
    • PS4 – 89/100
    • XONE – 83/100
  • Game Informer: 9.25/10
  • GameSpot: 8.5/10
  • IGN: 9/10

Anyway, that’s it for me this week. Again I’m sorry for the delayed post and I swear it won’t happen again.

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